Author Archives: American Woodworker Editors

About American Woodworker Editors

American Woodworker magazine was acquired by F+W Media (parent company of Popular Woodworking) in 2014. We are delighted to share some of the best AW content here on the PW website.

Q & A: Herringbone Inlay

Q: I’d like to use my own wood to make herringbone inlay, but how do I go about it? A: Making your own inlay isn’t tough—you just need a well-tuned tablesaw and a good combination or general-purpose blade. A herringbone inlay is one of the simplest inlay styles to make once...

Troubleshoot Your Plane

Troubleshoot Your Plane Practical Solutions to 6 Common Problems By Tom Caspar When a plane is working right, it can produce a silky-smooth surface that absolutely glistens. When it doesn’t work, you get an ugly surface covered with blemishes. The problem can be your sharpening, your technique, or the plane itself....

Q & A: Silencing a Squeaky Tablesaw

Q: My tablesaw screeches like nails on a chalkboard whenever I adjust the blade. WD-40 made the noise go away for a while, but now it’s back. What do I do? A: That sound can drive you crazy! It’s a clear sign that the gears under your saw are due for...

Master Cabinetmaker’s Bench

Master Cabinetmaker’s Bench A proven design that will last a lifetime. By Alan Turner I have many tools in my shop, but the most important one is my bench. It has a classic design, favored by cabinetmakers for generations. I’ve spent a long time refining the details of this bench. I’ve...

All About Vises

All About Vises Add clamping power to your workbench. By Randy Johnson and Tom Caspar A good vise is tool money well spent. It’s a solid investment in your workbench that pays off every time you need to hold a piece of wood.  Two Types of Vises Everybody’s familiar with the...

4 Hand Tools for Stringing

4 Hand Tools for Stringing Find out more about using hand tools to make stringing inlay. Stringing reached its peak as an art form way back in the late 18th century, long before power tools. In those days, both the grooves and the strips were made by hand with great precision....

Moisture Meters

Moisture Meters By Dave Munkittrick Think of a moisture meter as cheap insurance. Spend $70 and you’ll never have to wonder whether that lumber you bought is too wet or too dry. You can tell if the “kiln-dried” pine you bought from the home center was dried to 9- percent moisture...