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The coping saw is generally unloved, unheralded and under-appreciated. Yet as far as I’m concerned, I wouldn’t enjoy woodworking as much without one.

When I started woodworking about age 11, my father forbade me from using machinery. So the only two saws I had were a panel saw with a blue plastic handle (which would not cut a limp biscuit), and a Craftsman coping saw, which I own and use to this day.

I’ve used that tool for everything (perhaps things I shouldn’t: game, deli meats). And as a result I am attached to the form.

However, I don’t know jack crap about the history of the lowly coping saw. And I wonder why no one has ever tried to improve upon the modern, barely usable form of the tool. I have looked through all my resources for the history and true explanation of the coping saw, but my books and downloads and academic sources have mostly failed me.

Now,


 

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