Digital Woodworking

cncLearn how computers, software and CNCs can contribute in your shop.

by Tim Celeski
pgs. 33-37

There are a lot of ways to do woodworking.

For example, there’s more than a dozen ways to make mortises and tenons. The same is true for almost everything a woodworker does. For any given task, everyone finds a way to do it that fits how they work or a particular situation. For most of us, woodworking is a combination of hand and machine tools and techniques. If you’re making a living as a furniture maker as I do, you probably tend to be more pragmatic in your choices and lean a bit harder on machines for added efficiency, accuracy and time saving.

As if there weren’t already enough options, there’s something new to consider. Thanks to lower prices and better designs, woodworkers can now add digitally controlled tools to their workshop. Yes, we’re talking about computers, software and CNC routers. How they work and the range of what they can do for woodworkers is unlike anything we’ve seen in the past.

I’ve discovered that with the right approach and a clear understanding of how to use digital tools in conjunction with hand tools and power tools, they can be great additions to a shop – the best of all worlds.

So, let’s take a peek into the world of technology, CNCs and digital wood-working.

Website: See more of the author’s work.
Blog: Tim Celeski is now blogging about CNC and other woodworking-related topics on the PWM Shop Blog.
Buy: No CNC? Your router is still capable of astounding work – check out “Router Techniques,” an article compilation.
Video: Watch the new documentary video about Wendell Castle, which gives a glimpse of his stunning work (some of which is now created by CNC). Available as DVD or video download.

From the December 2016 issue, #229
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