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 In Shop Blog, Woodworking Videos

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Making a Replacement Wedge

Making a Replacement Wedge

Moulding planes, in today’s hand plane world, are a small piece of the working arsenal. However, a few (hundred) years back, they were the bread and butter of the custom woodworker. Able to create simple quarter-round moulding or a complicated crown moulding, there could be dozens if not hundreds of wooden planes in a set.

Laying out an Ogee Profile

Laying out an Ogee Profile

With the resurgence of interest in hand tool woodworking, moulding planes are making a comeback. No more collected for their look on a shelf, these planes are being put back to work, and that makes Bill Anderson smile. His knowledge and experience with moulding planes makes him the perfect teacher for anyone looking to select the planes worth refurbishing and put them back into use.

Grinding the Profile

Grinding the Profile

In “Choosing, Refurbishing & Using Moulding Planes”, Bill walks you through the classifications of moulding planes, discusses what to look for when shopping and then takes you step-by-step through the process to bring the iron back to cutting shape (and how to make a new iron if it’s missing).


 

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