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By Nick Engler
Pages: 45-52

From the June 2004 issue #141
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Routers were developed to cut moulded shapes in wood. Although their workshop role has expanded (greatly) during the last century to include joinery and other operations, moulding is still what they do best. They remain the chief woodworking tools for edge and surface “treatments” – cutting decorative shapes.

Before we get into the techniques for making decorative moulded shapes, let’s review these shapes and how they’re combined. In many woodworkers’ minds, this is muddy water. Open any tool catalog to the router bit section and you’ll find whole pages of shapes, all in a jumble. But don’t worry. There is some order to this chaos.

From the June 2004 issue #141
Buy this issue now


 

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