Handplanes

Handplanes are the mascot of hand tool woodworking – its profile is instantly recognizable, harkening back to a day when the loudest noise in the woodshop was a hand-wielded hammer. But don’t let that image fool you. Every shop needs at least one handplane. We cover the gamut – from the simple block plane to the more complex joinery planes and moulding planes. Here you’ll find the resources to learn how to use the many species of handplane as well as the handplane essentials you need to know. Master handplane techniques and you will be well on your way to mastering woodworking.

The final few passes with the round plane create a nice looking cove.

Hollow and Round Woodworking Planes: Where Do I Start?

  Perhaps, like me, you enjoy owning tools that are versatile. I have two hefty, industrial-grade electric routers and a good selection of carbide-tipped cutters, which cover a lot of molding work. However, as you produce ever larger moldings, you can very quickly reach the limit of what a router will handle. For example, the...

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Veritas Bevel-down Bench Planes

Blade carrier helps to preserve cap-iron settings with ease.  by Christopher Schwarz page 14 When Veritas redesigned its bevel-down bench planes, the Canadian company started from scratch. Released in the fall of 2014, these tools share almost no DNA with the company’s previous generation. And, in the Veritas tradition, the company’s engineers also chucked...

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Modern Wooden Planes … Why?

Let me be honest: I do know how to use a handplane, and I have used a jointer plane once or twice. But it was a metal-bodied plane – only remotely similar to a wooden-bodied plane as used during the 18th century. I liked the feel of the plane, and its long body made...

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Customizable Bevel-down Planes from Veritas

by Megan Fitzpatrick page 16 We don’t typically include tools in this column that we’ve not actually tested, but we’re making an exception for these five new bevel-down planes from Veritas (Nos. 4, 41⁄2, 5, 51⁄2 and 7 in the Stanley numbering system). I got a preview of these at Lee Valley Tools in...

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The Only Handplane You Need?

Editor’s note – This post and video originally appeared in The Wood Whisperer Guild, an innovative and high-quality website with tons of woodworking information. Many thanks to Marc Spagnuolo for making this paid content available for free on the Popular Woodworking site! Buy Marc’s book, “Hybrid Woodworking,” in our store for an exclusive video...

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3 Jigs for Handplaning

For many contemporary woodworkers the plane’s position as the iconic tool of woodworking has long since been replaced by the table saw, but for the traditional woodworker it remains our most important and most varied tool. One special advantage – apart from the pleasure and safety in using a plane rather than a machine...

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5 Mistakes Beginners Make with Block Planes

When I teach beginners, one of the most common phrases I hear is, “I cannot get this (insert tool name) to work. What’s wrong?” They hand the tool to me and the fun begins. Though block planes are dirt-simple handplanes, there are some important points about them that are rarely discussed in the literature....

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Tightening the ‘Stay-Set’ Chipbreaker

Last week I took my new Clifton No. 5 to teach a full-size toolchest class at The Woodworkers Club in Rockville, Md. Several of the students used it on their toolchests, which they made using cherry, pine or poplar. The plane did quite well – the iron stayed sharp through planing up an entire...