skilled Woodworker

AW Extras 4/3/14 – Tablesaw Tool Drawer

Tablesaw Tool Drawer It seems like I’m always misplacing my push sticks, blade wrench, featherboards and other small tablesaw accessories.To solve my problem I added a shallow drawer under the side feed table. I simply built a wood box that was open in the front and screwed it to the bottom...

Q & A: Safely Rough-Cut Twisted Lumber

Q & A: Safely Rough-Cut Twisted Lumber   Q: I buy my lumber rough, and sometimes I get a very twisted or crooked board. What’s a safe way to crosscut and put a straight edge on these awkward boards? A: I use a two-step process for safely prepping severely twisted or...

AW Extra 3/13/14 – Pipe Clamp Protectors

Pipe Clamp Protectors Iron pipe clamps can mar a finished surface and leave nasty black stains if they touch a wet glue line. My solution is to raise the pipe above the surface with corrugated-plastic wiring harness covers sold in automotive stores. They come in a variety of sizes and are...

Q & A: Taking Dimensions From Photos

Q & A: Taking Dimensions From Photos   Q: Sometimes a catalog has a piece of furniture that I’d love to build myself. How can I get the dimensions for a piece of furniture off a photograph? A: Try this method for scaling from photos: Start by taping the picture to...

Q & A: Soaking Stones

Q & A: Soaking Stones   Q: I just bought a 6,000-grit Japanese waterstone mounted on a wooden base. Can I soak it like my other stones? Also, what’s the purpose of a Nagura stone? A: Your 6,000-grit waterstone absorbs water quickly and doesn’t need to be kept in water. Just...

Q & A: Chisel Sharpening Angles

Grind a new 25-degree bevel. Grind all the way up to the leading end. Make sure the end is square within a few degrees. To prevent overheating, frequently dip the chisel in water as you approach the leading end. Q & A: Chisel Sharpening Angles   Q: I’m confused about sharpening...

Bleaching Wood

Bleaching Wood Subtract color to add life By Michael Dresdner There are four types of bleach that woodworkers commonly use: chlorine, two-part wood bleach, oxalic acid and peroxide. Two-part bleach changes the actual color of wood and the other three remove stains. Read on to find out what each one does...