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A larger base for the router was the ticket for bridging the open areas left by routing out the plywood for the router’s base. It was later used as a small circle cutting jig for the tabletop and plastic inserts. Use the same cutter and it’s easy to keep track of dimensions for cutting inside or outside circles.

A larger base for the router was the ticket for bridging the open areas left by routing out the plywood for the router’s base. It was later used as a small circle cutting jig for the tabletop and plastic inserts. Use the same cutter and it’s easy to keep track of dimensions for cutting inside or outside circles.

Commercially made router tables are everywhere these days. Some of them come with more gizmos and gadgets than a ’59 Edsel. By the time you tally up all the add-ons, the price approaches a medium-duty shaper. Here’s my short list of “must-have” features for a good router table:

• A table the size of a carrier deck.

• Compact design so it can store easily.

• A stout fence that’s long and easy to adjust.

• Easy bit-height adjustment with no stooping.


 

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