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Before I could strip the bark off the dugout chair, I needed to shape the chair’s back. The bark had all my layout marks indicating the final shape of the chair.

Armed with the TurboPlane, I smoothed out the steps I had cut into the stump earlier with my chainsaw. When I shaped the chair with a chainsaw, I sawed kerfs up and down the back of the chair that then acted as guides for the TurboPlane. When the kerfs disappeared, I knew I was close to my final line and had only a little more shaping to do.

Here you can see the steps and the kerfs that guided the final shape of the back.

The outer bark came off easily and stuck readily to my clothes and any exposed skin (I just took my second shower of the day). But the inner back is thick, especially near the bottom of the tree. So I decided to remove the outer bark today and save the inner bark for tomorrow.

Once


 

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perfect treehouse