Workbench Storage Build Begins

2M4A0072As you can see, I did get into the shop this week to begin on my workbench storage boxes. The thing I most like about building my own design – after 15 plus years building 18th- and early 19th-Century designs for customers – is that I can change the design clear up until I can’t. After reading a few of the comments in my last post (click here), I have made a couple changes. (Thank you Tom8021 for reminding me about Tage Frid’s books – I went back for a refresher on plywood joinery.)

Changes? I decided that these under-the-bench storage boxes were too deep at 22 1/2″, so I shortened the depth to 15 1/2″. 2M4A0073Also, many of the comments focused on the idea that my workbench storage boxes didn’t need fancy dovetails if they were to always sit under the bench. That’s also a great point. However, I think these boxes can be travel boxes, so I plan to build them out of yellow pine and with dovetailed corners. Also, I’ll add handles to the tops of each box so they are easy to lug around.

As I began milling the lumber, I was amazed at how difficult it is to work in a shop other than the one you’re use to. I had to locate clamps, snatch glue and borrow a tape measure just to glue-up four panels. In my home shop,55 Jigs I use a pair of T-stands (shown above, right) to elevate my panels as I glue – I find it easier to manipulate my boards if they are off the table or clamps, and if you need to slip a clamp on the underside of your panel, having the boards on stands allows easy access. The stands are so simple to build that you might want to give them a try. Jigs make work quicker and easier.

If you are jig-deficient in your shop, you need a copy of the “55 Best Shop-Made Jigs.” You’ll be surprised at how much you get done in your shop.

— Glen D. Huey

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