October 2015 #220

Popular Woodworking Magazine October 2015 Cover One glance at the cover of our October issue may make you want to sit down – specifically on the comfortable curves and clean lines of Jeff Miller’s slat-back chair. Jeff teaches you two techniques for bent laminations, shows you how he uses patterns to lay out the shapely legs, and shares his plans for a shop-made mortising jig that helps you perfect angled joinery. You’ll also learn a neat trick for leveling the legs when you’re all done – and you’ll have a great place to take a rest.

When it comes to drawers, many woodworkers obsess over dovetails but give the bottom little thought. Geremy Coy shares the history and how-to of “Drawer Slips” – a durable, elegant way to affix drawer bottoms that’s little-known on this side of the Atlantic. You’ll find out how to make and install three kinds of drawer slips, all with hand tools.

Our August issue featured the traveling chest’s build – now get a look at the embellished lid that’s the real treasure inside. In “Tool Chest as Art,” Jameel Abraham walks you through creating a sunburst inlay, along with “3D marquetry” that encompasses carved inlays, banding and more.

In “Make a ‘Raamtang,’” you’ll learn how to build an incredibly useful wedge-powered vise. Zachary Dillinger shows you how to use offcuts and scrap pieces to make it fast and cheap. (The name? Dutch for “window-pliers.”)

Combining a sleek design with simple plywood construction, Michael Crow’s “Mid-century Modern Bookcase” works as well as a room divider as it does against the wall.

George Walker profiles furniture designer and builder Dan Mosheim; in End Grain, read about a father’s legacy, and more.

To buy the October 2015 issue, click here.

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Slat-back Chair

Curves, angles and comfort – this piece will have you sitting pretty. by Jeff Miller p. 26 I’ve always found making something simple yet refined to be more work than it seems. I suspect that the slat-back chair doesn’t exactly look simple to build if you’re not a chairmaker. But it is relatively simple...

Drawer Slips

An historical detail adds refinement to projects both period and modern. by Geremy Coy p. 35 The 18th century – a time when human hands were set to work in order to create the objects of material culture; when men and women by their sweat and ingenuity wrought wares in the latest fashions; when...

Tool Chest as Art

An embellished lid is your woodworking calling card. by Jameel Abraham p. 40 Embellished tool chests are perhaps the quintessential calling card of the cabinetmaker. From Benjamin Seaton’s mahogany and tulipwood masterpiece to the unequalled work of Henry Studley, we woodworkers tend to pull out all the stops when we decorate our chests. I’m...

Make a ‘Raamtang’

This Dutch joiner’s tool leverages simple design into a cheap & effective workholding device. By Zachary Dillinger p. 46 While studying Gerrit van der Sterre’s “Four Centuries of Dutch Planemakers” (Primavera Pers, 2001), I ran across what the author calls a “raamtang” – Dutch for “window pliers.” As you might guess, it is a...

Mid-century Modern Bookcase

Simple joinery serves this sophisticated geometric design. by Michael Crow p. 51 Mid-century modern design is enjoying a surge in popularity, and rightly so: Its clean lines and functional design make it practical and attractive, two traits evident in this bookcase by an unknown designer. Its stark, geometric design shows modern roots while giving...

‘The Secret Mitre Dovetail’

David Charlesworth’s new video is groundbreaking instruction. by Christopher Schwarz p. 14 The “secret miter” dovetail is considered the most elegant and difficult of all the dovetail joints to make. As a result, many woodworkers hesitate to even attempt the joint, which can seamlessly wrap the grain around a furniture carcase to a beautiful...

Veritas Stainless Steel Trammel Points

by Megan Fitzpatrick p. 16 These clever stainless steel trammel points (for scribing large arcs and circles) from Veritas work a little differently than my vintage set, which fit only on a fixed-sized beam. The narrow-bodied heads are open on one side, and can thus be attached to any flat piece of material up...

Sterling Tool Works Stainless Steel French Curves

by Christopher Schwarz p. 16 I like using French curves for laying out hyperbolas, ellipses and parabolas when designing furniture details. These curves are not static arcs – they are segments of the Euler spiral – and so the shapes they create have more spring and life. The typical set of French curves consists...

Designer Profile: Dan Mosheim

His creative process starts with pencil and moves on to CAD and CNC. by George R. Walker p. 18 I first stumbled onto Dan Mosheim about six years ago through his eclectic blog, “Dorset Custom Furniture – A Woodworkers Photo Journal” (dorsetcustomfurniture.blogspot.com). It’s primarily about building and designing furniture, but it’s also a peek into...