Limbert Wastebox

<p><strong>Patching Trick</strong> Checks in your boards can be tricky. They might get larger, they might not. To fill mine,  I made a quick and effective putty. The putty is made from equal parts of fine cherry sawdust and cyanoacrylate glue (super glue to most people). The putty sets up in about five minutes as hard as a rock. It’s sandable and — when finished — looks like one of those dark streaks of cherry that’s common to the species. Then cross your fingers and hope the check stays small. Be sure to have some solvent on hand if you mess up the patch. </p>

Patching Trick Checks in your boards can be tricky. They might get larger, they might not. To fill mine, I made a quick and effective putty. The putty is made from equal parts of fine cherry sawdust and cyanoacrylate glue (super glue to most people). The putty sets up in about five minutes as hard as a rock. It’s sandable and — when finished — looks like one of those dark streaks of cherry that’s common to the species. Then cross your fingers and hope the check stays small. Be sure to have some solvent on hand if you mess up the patch.

Charles P. Limbert’s furniture designs are best thought of as American Arts & Crafts pieces that went to finishing school in Europe. Like no other furniture maker of his time, Limbert was able to combine the massive straight forms of American pieces from the Stickleys and progressive design from Europe. The result is straightforward furniture that has a certain flair to it, a subtle curve or a cutout.

This waste basket is a replica of the #255 Waste Paper Box found in Booklet No. 112, one of the many catalogs his company produced after the turn of the century. The proportions of this can are identical to the original. The joinery is simple and sturdy, much like that I’ve seen on other Limbert pieces. The only change I’ve made in the appearance is that I used cherry instead of quartersawn white oak.

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