February 2013 #202

Popular Woodworking Magazine February 13 Cover In “Southern Cellarette,” the cover story for the February 2013 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine, Glen D. Huey builds a classic 18th-century liquor cabinet. This elegant walnut, maple and pine box is made with dividers to store your most prized and rare bottles. Wilbur Pan explores the world of “Japanese Chisels” and explains that, contrary to popular belief, they’re good for hardwoods as well as soft. Learn to create stunningly vibrant and detailed in inlays in “Shell, Stone & Metal Inlay.” Employing some of the knowledge he gleaned from his family’s jewelry business, Marco Cecala shows you step by step how to inlay a flower pattern. Darrel Peart makes a Greene & Greene-style bed with simplified construction in “A Bed for the Thorsen House.” Journey to the world’s largest producer of natural Arkansas oilstones in “Dan’s Whetstones.” In “Fast Fix for Teetering Legs,” Gary Rogowski demonstrates an unorthodox table saw trick for put your wobbly four-legged furniture back on solid ground.

In this month’s tool test, we take a look at “Blue Spruce Firmer Chisels,” the “Micro Fence Micro Plunge Base” and the “Veritas ‘Workshop Striking Knife.’”

In this month’s Design Matters, “A Practiced Eye,” George R. Walker shows you how straight lines can help you generate pleasing curves. In Arts & Mysteries, Adam Cherubini examines whether 18th-century tools and techniques work for modern pieces in “Tools Chest Case Construction.” Flexner on Finishing explores “Wipe-on Finishes.” And finally in End Grain, W. Paul Olsen talks about a gift from his loving wife in “Frankenbench.” And of course you’ll find Letters and Tricks of the Trade.

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Southern Cellarette

Combine simple construction and sophisticated proportions.By Glen D. Huey Pages 22-29In 1760, Dutch gin bottles made their way to the Colonies. Soon thereafter, the first known example of a lidded box designed to hold those gin bottles was built. Many of the bottle boxes, gin boxes or cellarettes, as they are known, have their origin...

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Japanese Chisels

The hard truth about these ancient tools.By Wilbur Pan Pages 30-32Japanese tools have a reputation of being suitable only for softwoods. This is an unfounded worry, especially in the case of Japanese chisels. As woodworker Kari Hultman (writer of The Village Carpenter blog) attests, “I would like to publicly profess my love of Japanese chisels....

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Shell, Stone & Metal Inlay

Learn a straightforward approach to creating stunning details.By Marco Cecala Pages 33-39I come to the field of woodworking with an unfair advantage. I grew up in a family jewelry business and did a lot of detail work from an early age. So it’s no surprise that when I started making furniture I was drawn to...

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A Bed for The Thorsen House

Make a Greene & Greene-style bed with simplified construction.By Darrell Peart Pages 40-47Recently I joined a group whose primary goal is to restore the Thorsen House, one of the “Ultimate Bungalows” designed by Charles and Henry Greene. In fact, I am on the board of directors of the Friends of the Thorsen House. Our purpose...

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Fast Fix For Teetering Legs

A simple table saw technique levels four legs in no time flat.By Gary Rogowski Pages 52-54Rock-n-roll. That’s what four-legged pieces have a habit of doing – even with perfect joinery and a careful and unhurried assembly. Even with all the care and attention you paid to building it correctly, it doesn’t sit flat on your...

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Veritas ‘Workshop Striking Knife’ Tool Test

By Megan Fitzpatrick Page 16 Spear-point marking knives are my favorite marking knives because they’re a good all-around choice for most layout tasks in the shop. Because a spear-point knife has two bevels and a flat back, it can easily register against a guide on either the right or left side – very handy...