20,000 Pages of Woodworking, One Low Price

Screen Shot 2015-02-02 at 3.24.11 PMRight now, we’re offering a “kit” that includes just about every page from every woodworking magazine in our store through 2014. In the “20,000 Pages of Woodworking Ultimate Collection,” you get the Popular Woodworking Magazine 1995-2013 DVD (which also includes a bonus video, “Finishes that Pop”), the 2014 Popular Woodworking Magazine compilation CD, the Woodworking Magazine CD, with all 16 issues we published, Woodwork Magazine 1989-2014 DVD, and American Woodworker 1985-2014 DVD. All for just $125 (64% less than the total value of each bought individually).

For a look at just some of what’s been offered over the years, below are links to a few of the articles from those pages that are free on our site (what we have available free is but a drop in the bucket compared to what you’ll find on the discs).

Creole Table, by Christopher Schwarz (Popular Woodworking Magazine, February 2007)
(The post also includes the recipe he uses for a delicious Creole duck & andouille étouffée)
• A dirt-simple Victorian Side Table, by well, me (Popular Woodworking Magazine, December 2010)
(I like this one because it’s quick and easy, but with the right wood, can look impressive)
Circular Cutting Board, by Robert W. Lang (Woodworking Magazine, Spring 2008)
(An excellent lesson in cutting round…and a nice gift project)
Table-saw Tenon Jig, by Robert W. Lang (Popular Woodworking Magazine, August 2007)
(This one may not be sexy, but if you use a table saw for joinery, it’s a must-build)
Moxon’s Ingenious Bench Vise, by Christopher Schwarz (Popular Woodworking Magazine, December 2010)
(Because I couldn’t dovetail (well) without it – and it makes most sawing at the bench a lot easier)
Barrister Bookcases, by Glen D. Huey, (Popular Woodworking Magazine, April 2007)
(Glen shares some clever techniques to make this classic project a little simpler)

And finally, two PDF scans – available on our web site only through this blog post:
Cannon Ball Bedstead, by Carlyle Lynch (The American Woodworker, Summer 1986)
(A historic reproduction by one of the most storied names in woodworking; the hand-drawn illustrations are simply gorgeous)
David Pye: Workmanship of Risk, by Glenn Gordon (Woodwork, December 1996)
(Because David Pye’s work is important and relevant for so many of today’s best craftsmen and craftswomen)

— Megan Fitzpatrick