Build an Outdoor Chair from a Quick-start Plan

I’m taking a couple days off in the deep woods (way offline). During this break I thought I’d run one of our most popular “Woodworking Daily” posts of all time – the quick-start project plan for David Thiel’s Outdoor Limbert Chair. If you haven’t already started an Adirondack chair this spring, or if you want a different option for outdoor seating, you should be able to write your own cut list and build an outdoor chair directly from the instructions below. Enjoy the Arts & Crafts era inspiration!

limbertplans

Build an Outdoor Chair with this Quick-start Plan

1. Cut parts for the 2 sides and align parts for pocket-screw assembly. Assemble the sides, then cut the top angle on each one.

Step one

Step one

2. Screw the stretchers in place, connecting the 2 sides.

Step two

Step two

3. Fit the plywood back and align for screwing. Predrill holes and install back.

Step three

Step three

4. Cut, fit and install the seat slats. Hint: David used screws in back and pins in front.

Step four

Step four

5. Add the arms and finishing touches, such as wood plugs. Paint the whole thing and you’re almost done!

Step five

Step five

6. Sit yourself down. Now you’re really done.

Step six awaits you.

Step six awaits you.

Step 6 is the most important. David tells me, “A pair of these chairs sits on my back porch with a small taboret table between them. It’s a wonderful place to sit and watch the sun come up (with coffee), or the moon come out (with wine).”

Note: the tools you need for this project are minimal. Always start by trying to use the tools you already own. If this is your very first woodworking project, check out our “I Can Do That” tool list.

Ready for more inspiration from the Arts & Crafts era, for cheap? “Arts & Crafts Inspiration” is on clearance in our store for around $9. Buy it and save!

Dan Farnbach

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Dan Farnbach

About Dan Farnbach

Dan apprenticed and worked in two professional shops during the years after college. But sweeping shop floors only goes so far toward learning woodworking. These days Dan is online editor for Popular Woodworking, and is learning new skills every day. He divides his time between Boston and Maine.

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