Chris Schwarz's Blog

10 Reasons NOT to Use Liquid Hide Glue for Furniture

A personal list. Your reasons may vary.
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10. If you rub your glue-y hands on your pants they will smell like a horse’s bum that has been boiled and then left in the sun (but the smell washes out).

— Christopher Schwarz

46 thoughts on “10 Reasons NOT to Use Liquid Hide Glue for Furniture

  1. tconover@fuse.net

    I am just getting started in woodworking (at age 66) and would like to do most of my work with hand tools and using traditional methods where practical.
    Is Chris’s list telling us that the only drawback to using hide glue is the smell?

  2. graphicgranny

    I would like toknow the reasons #1 – 9 as they didn’t show here. Hide glue is perfect if you want to do a crackle finish! Just spread the glue where you want it, both thick and thin. Let it dry and use acrylic paints to cover! Try this on a scarp piece of wookd top see the results.

  3. CarlosJD

    It’s true that I may be a little slow, but I’m assuming that because 1 thru 9 did not show up you advocate the use of hide glue for furniture? I live in Las Vegas and a friend had me re-glue a box made in Hawaii and put together with hide glue. It was summer and I thought that the heat caused it to come apart. Is this possible?

  4. khalsans

    OK, how about 10 good uses for that foamy polyurethane glue, the stuff with the image of a large primate on the label? My list kinda looks like the one above, with the exception of #10. It’s good for fixing loose drywall anchors, but does it have a niche in woodworking?

    1. BillT

      Years ago, I sat in on a one-day seminar led by Kelly Mehler, well-known custom woodworker from Berea, KY. He said that polyurethane glue (which is what Gorilla Glue is) is good for edge-gluing table tops and similar panels. I don’t know whether he still advocates that – this was about 10 years ago.

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