Shop-made Bandings

federal bandingLearn to make your own and you’ll never have to compromise your design.

by Mario Rodriguez
pages 37-42

Bandings and stringing are a dramatic and exciting way to dress up your period furniture. I see them as a way to highlight some aspect of a piece by directing the viewer’s eye to a particular area. Bandings give emphasis to the lines of a piece, similar to pinstriping on a car.

The use of bandings also demonstrates a skill closely tied to the successful design of a piece. In other words, a too-thick, busy or colorful banding can ruin a piece. That’s why I never buy bandings; I make them. That way, I get to decide on the pattern, colors, types of wood and size. I never have to settle or compromise, or modify my design to suit what’s commercially available.

Here are a few tenets to which I always adhere:

■ Eye-catching patterns: Design or copy a pattern that causes the viewer to pause, and perhaps ponder how it was made. An attractive pattern will be part puzzle and part tease, with a touch of pizzazz.

■ Clarity and high contrast: The most successful bandings are constructed in a manner that amplifies the contrast between different pieces and colors. Each piece clearly stands out from the surrounding pieces/segments. That means the grain direction should be oriented to stand out in contrast to the surrounding wood.

Article:Soup Up a Veneer Saw,” by Mario Rodriguez.
Article: Learn how to make “Diamond Banding.”
In Our Store:Make an Inlaid Gallery Table with Rob Millard.”
To Buy:Building a Pembroke Table with Rob Millard.”

From the February 2016 issue, #233
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