Miter Half-lap Joinery


With a router, straight bit and plywood scrap, turn a weak joint into a superhero of strength.
By Glen D. Huey
Page: 38

From the August 2010 issue #184
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One of the strongest joints in woodworking is a properly fit mortise-and-tenon and the opposite in strength is a simple butt joint. For years I built base frames with mortise-and-tenon joints at the rear and mitered corners at the front. The miters were joined with biscuits. The rear joints were much stronger, so I wanted to add strength to those mitered front corners, but how?

Not with mechanical fasteners; screws were out. I needed something quick to create and when assembled, I wanted the joint to retain a mitered look. The answer was a mitered half-lap joint. With a half-lap, there is plenty of fl at-grain glue surface, and that increases the holding power, big time.

Video: Watch how to build and use another dirt-simple router jig.
Article: Build a jig to make straight, square dados fit exactly where you want them to.
To buy: Pick up a copy of “Danny Proulx’s 50 Shop-Made Jigs & Fixtures.”


From the August 2010 issue #184
Buy this issue now