Article Index Power Tool Joinery

Power-tool Joinery: The Case for Case Miters

These joints look great. Cutting and clamping them is the real trick. By Bill Hylton Pages: 38-40 From the February 2004 issue #139 Buy this issue now What joint would you use at the corners of a case? If appearance is a consideration – when is it not? – you definitely...

Power-tool Joinery: Building Glazed Doors

Most cope-and-stick bits can produce frames that will house glass as well as wood panels. Here’s how to do it. By Bill Hylton Pages: 100-103 From the November 2005 issue #151 Buy this issue now Here at chez Hylton, our kitchen cabinetry includes a mix of raised-panel doors and glazed doors....

Power-tool Joinery: Template Mortising

Your plunge router and a simple guide enable you to cut a mortise anywhere. By Bill Hylton Pages: 99-101 From the October 2005 issue #150 Buy this issue now Template mortising is an excellent technique  for all sorts of special mortising challenges. It works for everyday mortising applications as well, but...

Power-tool Joinery: Cope-and-Stick Joints

Run the moulding and make the joint with this time-tested technique. By Bill Hylton Pages: 30-33 From the August 2005 issue #149 Buy this issue now The so-called cope-and-stick joint – a.k.a. the rail-and-stile joint, the rail-and-pattern joint, etc. – is an efficiency expert’s dream system. The joint is virtually synonymous...

Power-tool Joinery: Box Joints

Cut this stout joint using a simple jig, and your table saw or router. By Bill Hylton Pages: 28-31 From the June 2005 issue #148 Buy this issue now Visit most any antiques store or flea market, and you’re sure to see stacks of old wooden boxes marked with the logos...

Power-tool Joinery: Tongue and Groove

There are many ways to cut this popular edge-to-edge joint. By Bill Hylton Pages: 86-88 From the April 2005 issue #147 Buy this issue now A tongue-and-groove joint is an edge joint with a mechanical interlock. The edge of one board has a groove. A matching tongue is formed on the...

Power-tool Joinery: Attaching Solid Wood Tabletops

Methods that allow wood to move with the seasons. By Bill Hylton Pages: 26-28 From the December 2006 issue #159 Buy this issue now About a decade ago, I made a drop-leaf table for a book of projects. When it came time to mount the top, I just drilled pilot holes...

Power-tool Joinery: Breadboard Ends Keep Tops Flat

This traditional joint ensures the only cup on your tabletop will have coffee in it. By Bill Hylton Pages: 78-80 From the October 2006 issue #157 Buy this issue now The breadboard end is a traditional device for preventing a broad panel such as a tabletop from cupping. It is a...

Power-tool Joinery: Keep Your Tabletops Flat

Battens: Just one proven method to keep you on a level playing field. By Bill Hylton Pages: 23-25 From the August 2006 issue #156 Buy this issue now The best way to keep a tabletop flat is to make it flat in the first place and to attach it properly to...