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Writing letters longhand is one of life’s simple pleasures, as is building this traditional lap desk.
By David Thiel
Pages: 70-75

From the June 2004 issue #141
Buy this issue now

The portable writing desk was an integral part of 18th and 19th century life, when writing was the only form of long-distance communication. As people spread across the globe in the 19th century, correspondence by mail became much more popular, and so did the writing desk.

The portable desks needed to be sturdy and lightweight, hold stationery and writing utensils, and have a place for people to write easily. The desk seen here will do all of the above, plus hold paper clips, rubber bands and more in the simple side drawer.

While you might not abandon your laptop computer for this more traditional item, it is an excellent place to write holiday cards, thank-you notes and personal correspondence. Though we all like the immediacy of e-mail, a hand-written letter always is a welcome surprise.


 

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