Crosscut Sled Jigs

Make your ‘MegaSled’ into a shop workhorse.

by James Hamilton
pages 56-60

In the previous issue, we built the MegaSled – a table saw sled designed to accommodate a series of joinery jigs. The jigs and attachments I cover in this article are just the beginning – and with them, you can cut flawless finger joints, tenons, lap and bridle joints, and even splined miters. Once you see how they interact with the unique features of the Mega Sled itself, you may be inspired to create your own unique accessories.

Refer to the cutlist to cut out all the parts at the outset, or prepare your parts one jig at a time (I recommend using hardwood-veneered plywood from the home center). Whatever course you take, be sure to label each piece with its assigned letter. Cut each piece so that all corners and edges are square, and as you assemble them, check each part with a combination square to keep everything true. A pneumatic brad-nailer will reduce clamping time.

Most of the jigs are designed to attach to the T-track in the sled fence with T-bolts and wing nuts or star knobs. Wait to bore the holes for these bolts until each jig is completed. Then place the jig on the fence and mark the locations of the holes directly on the jig.

Article: Build a dovetail joint jig for the MegaSled. (to come)
Article: 
Read & make the “MegaSled,” from the October 2017 issue.
Website:
Visit James Hamilton’s website: stumpynubs.com, where you’ll find tons of plans for clever shop builds and machine accessories.
To Buy: “The Homemade Workshop,” by James Hamiltonavailable in paperback and as an eBook.

From the November 2017 issue, #235