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design in practice

Photo courtesy Chipstone Foundation

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the roots of Arts & Crafts furniture and, in the comments, reference was made to “what makes a particular furniture style?” From the first time I took a class trip to Colonial Williamsburg (it was the Bicentennial…everyone went to Williamsburg, right?) I was drawn to period furniture – I didn’t know why but I liked it.

I’ve been studying it so long there’s just lots of aspects of it that are second nature to me. So, when I read comments and questions from people stating they don’t know (or can’t get) a definitive answer as to “what makes a particular furniture style?” I’m taken back to when I was a kid watching Mack Headley and his apprentices working away in the Anthony Hay shop (see the CW reference above, if you’re confused). And, because I remember a time when period furniture was a complete mystery to me, I want to share a little of what I’ve learned since 1976.

There’s


 

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