A cradle for a Combination Square | Popular Woodworking Magazine
 In Feature Articles

We may receive commission when you use our affiliate links. However, this does not impact our recommendations.

An accurate combination square is the cornerstone of every layout work. It allows us to measure and mark joinery, and check for flatness and squareness of workpieces, setups and tools. I have a few squares and I treat them with respect, making sure that they would not get nicked by other tools or accidentally drop to the floor. When I designed the new pegboard cradle for my 12” Starrett square I followed too simple principals. First, I wanted to make sure that the square will nest securely inside a wooden track, and secondly I wanted to maintain the principle of mobility within the pegboard matrix, or in other words, to allow me to migrate the cradle as needed to a different location. 

A few months ago I built a very similar cradle to carry my school’s squares. And since it proved to be a very useful system I decided to adopt this concept and retrofit it into to my recently designed pegboard system.

The cradle is a simple grooved batten that is notched on one side to facilitate the square’s blade. This design will prevent the square from sliding out of the cradle, which can lead to regrettable fall. 

You can groove the batten on the table saw, the router table or with a grooving plane. Then use a bandsaw, or a dado set, or some hand tools to notch the side of the cradle. 

To hang the cradle I used two angled hooks. To set the hooks into the cradle I drilled two angled holes. In addition I trimmed the corner of the cradle at the exit holes to allow the roundish steel corner of the hook to nest flush in. 

Watch this clip to see how the rack works.

Recommended Posts

Leave a Comment

0

Start typing and press Enter to search