In American Woodworker Blog

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The last version of the hope-chest was the one that both my clients and I loved the most. It called for a frame and panel construction and a lid that once used to be part of a piano. 

We decided to aim towards this look and agreed on a few features: The frame and panel constriction would be painted with milk-paint; the lid would retain its mahogany appeal; a dedication impression would be included on the front part of the chest. You can see in my drawing that I thought to add a flared ending, but this idea was eventually abandoned for a more reserved look.  

Here is the piano lid as I found it:

I started the construction by building the panels. As you recall, I was using reclaimed wine boxes for the job. I began by dismantling the boxes and preparing the panels: milling them to thickness; creating a tung and groove joint between them and gluing individual panels together to make a wider panel. 

I fitted the panels into a groove that I milled in the rail construction. These rails ware predominantly made from reclaimed miscellaneous students' desk parts that I milled, sawed and routed. I crafted a tenon at the end of each rail which will fit in a matching mortice on the legs. 

Next time I will show how the legs, rails and panels come together.  


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