Woodworking Classes

Our editors, all of whom are avid woodworkers as well, attend and teach at woodworking schools and conferences all over the world. Their classes cover everything from woodworking basics to advanced hand tool and power tool techniques and seminars on using SketchUp tutorials. The posts below, from out editors blog, will give you a good idea of not only what it’s like to take a woodworking class, but also teach you a few of the techniques you’d learn from being there.

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The Dutch Campaign Tool Chest

This week, I built a lower cabinet for my small Dutch tool chest, a project featured in the October 2013 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine. The unit I just built sits below the tool chest proper and does a few nice things. 1. It gives me extra space for tooling and hardware that I...

Workbench Day 2: The Case for Workbench Classes

Building a workbench at a school is, in my calculation, a wise investment. Good schools have huge machines – wide planers, beefy mortisers and sliding table saws – that can make difficult jobs a breeze. You also have lots of help – another 10 to 20 people who can help you muscle the stock....

Workbench Day 1: Grab the Ash With Both Hands

The hardest part about teaching a class on building a workbench isn’t the teaching part at all. It’s finding good material that makes the class a pleasure – instead of a battle against the material. This week I’m teaching a class on building a traditional French workbench at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking....

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Workbench Joinery: 10 Years of Tenons

Tomorrow morning I start a new workbench class at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking. While I’ve lost count of the number of workbenches I’ve built or midwifed into this world, I never tire of the grueling and exhilarating labor they require. For each class, I design a new workbench from scratch that is...

Routing wood? The process and results will depend on bit and collet sizes.

5 FAQs on Routing Wood

Woodworkers ask me a lot of questions on routing wood, and many of the questions are similar, so here’s a short list of FAQs and answers to help you. Question #1 – I just purchased/inherited a router that only takes 1/4″ bits. Can I put 1/2″ bits in this router? Answer – If the...

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Do You Know Wood?

When I started my job as director of marketing at a lumber company, I received an e-mail from Christopher Schwarz telling me that I would be in a unique position to help educate scores of woodworkers about wood, something they ironically know little about. I laughed it off at the time and felt he...

ASTM (formerly the American Society for Testing and Materials) D 2665 spells out guidelines for Schedule 40 PVC pipe such as wall thickness, minimum and maximum wall thickness, inside and outside dimensions, and pressure capacity.

Dust Collection System FAQ

Is there any advantage/disadvantage to installing a dust collector outside the shop? It may sound as resolute as a long-range weather forecast, but yes, maybe and no. It is really a personal choice. Locating the dust collection machine outside the shop will lower sound levels and free up shop space. For some woodworkers (me...

This toy, called a plasma globe, effectively demonstrates electricity build-up in a DIY dust collector.

DIY Dust Collector – Avoiding Spark Potential

Woodworkers love their toys. Table saws, jointers and planers are serious big-boy (and big-girl) toys. Planes, chisels and saws are cherished, too, and though we all take our craft and hobby seriously, we just seem to love our toys. We collect woodworking toys and play with them as much as we can. Lately, though,...

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New Online Course – Router Basics with Colin Knecht

Many newcomers to woodworking consider routers scary and confusing tools. No wonder – there is so much to know about wood routing. Not only is there a wide variety of routers and router tables, but also a large range of bits, jigs and accessories. Even for experienced woodworkers this can be daunting. The “scary”...