Have Dust, Will Travel

DC1As dawn broke, the sounds of heavy equipment filled the air. Today we began breaking down the dust collector from my shop in Pennsylvania. Tomorrow we’ll load it onto a trailer and it will head west to Ohio but it will not be going to my new shop outside Cincinnati. Frankly, it’s just too big for my new neighborhood.

DC2Let’s face it: Most people don’t want to look at a story-and-a-half, rusty, old dust collector in the back of the neighbor’s yard. Most of my neighbors here in Pennsylvania had no clue what it was. I had gotten all kinds of guesses and inquiries. Some thought I was a mad scientist building some sort of rocket ship out of rusty old metal while others thought I was an abstract artist.

DC3This is the first shop where I’ve had real dust collection. I know it looks old and rusty to you, but that’s a 6,600 cubic-foot-per-minute Roto-Clone with a 15-horsepower three-phase motor. That fan on the forks is about 4′ in diameter. Surprisingly, the collector was fairly quiet but the lights dimmed in a 10-block radius when I turned it on.

DC4And the rust, well that’s only skin deep. Those dust bins are made from 1/4″ plate steel. The paint may be peeling but there’s more than a little life left in the old girl. So, I hope she enjoys her new home – and she won’t be going alone. My 30″ Yates planer and the 16″ Calloday jointer from my shop will be joining her. All three will be heading out tomorrow morning to their new home in northeastern Ohio. I guess if I start missing them too much, I can always take the four-hour ride and visit them.

 Chuck Bender

8 thoughts on “Have Dust, Will Travel

  1. crazymanmichael

    hmmmm you’re moving to cinnci and your shop is going to northeastern ohio…. that’s going to be a long commute from cinnci’s location in southwestern ohio!!!

      1. Chuck BenderChuck Bender Post author

        At nearly 40″ overall width and roughly 90″ in length, and the new shop still just an ever changing plan, real estate is too valuable for such a large single use machine. That jointer was definitely one of my favorite machines in the shop. Not only did it work well but the background story was better.

        Shortly after I left Irion Company Furnituremakers and started my own company I got a call from a friend, Steve Latta. “Hey Chuck, can you use a 16″ jointer?” he asked. Naturally I said absolutely and asked how much it was going to cost (amongst other details). Steve and I had been friends for quite a long time at this point and he shot me a price (I figured considerably less than $.50 a pound). When I exuberantly jumped at the price, his reply was “Great but you’ll have to pick it up pretty quickly because my wife wants it out of the dining room.”

        To answer your question, I really have no idea why I let it go now that I think about it.

  2. unioncarpenter95

    Hi Chuck. Shipping the big boys to Northeast Ohio… any chance they’re coming to my house??!! Plenty of room here and I’d always let you visit.

    David

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