CPSC Votes to Begin Table Saw Rules Process

By a unanimous vote, the Consumer Product Safety Commission voted today to begin the formal process of creating new rules to reduce table saw injuries, according to this story in the Washington Post. The next step will be to accept public comments for 60 days, then the commission will begin the two-fold task of deciding if new regulations are needed, and if so, how to write those regulations. We’ll be watching for an official announcement asking for public comments, and we’ll let you know how to participate.

Read more articles about this issue.

 

–Robert W. Lang

6 thoughts on “CPSC Votes to Begin Table Saw Rules Process

  1. NodPen

    So….the greedy, money-hungry lawyers strike again — this time, under the guise of “wanting to protect the populace from injury”. How stupid do these legal-beagle bozos think we really are? Anything to make a buck. So, this guy invents what has turned-out to be a fabulous idea that has, I’m sure saved many a “digit” in the home shops of America. What a wonderful thing ! Good for him — and us !
    Yet, being a lawyer at heart, along the way, he files a blue zillion patents that he plans to use “in the future” when he makes his plea to the CPSC to require that EVERY table saw manufacturer uses some form of his technology to comply with new rules that will make him filthy rich.
    No surprises here. After all, he is a LAWYER….a member of the same society of coniving, underhanded turkeys who are controlling our government. And we all know full well what a wonderful job they’re doing of that, don’t we?
    Typical sneaky, shiftless, low-life profiteering behavior from yet another member of the society of professionals who are well-noted for such actions. The guy starts out with a great idea that has been beneficial to many people — made a lot of money selling his products to satisfied customers — then simply can no longer resist turning his idea into a scam that could make him a zillionaire.
    He can’t be happy having a great idea and a great business that’s made him a lot of money, I’m sure. No. He has to see if he can put as many of his competitors out of business as possible…and their thousands of employees out of work along the way…and maybe even be lucky enough to be the ONLY table saw manufacturer left in America ! The American (lawyers’) dream !
    What a swell fellow !

  2. Fred Krueger

    A lot of us use dangerous tools everyday in our work or hobby without killing ourselves. There must be some knowledge in people’s mind of how to use certain tools & a government regulation will not make things safer. If we continue down this road of absurd restrictions & regulations we will kill an individual’s ingenuity, incentive & desire to bring about more & better ideas for the future.
    This point only came about because one firm’s desire to have a captive market for them alone. Active older woodworkers should be the ones deciding this question…..

  3. GregM

    Since the CSPC only regulate consumer products, this will only apply to “hobby” woodworkers – des this mean that we are going to see two separate lines of table saws on the market, some labeled “For Professional Use Only”?

    Ironically, the lawsuit that drew attention to this whole thing concerned commercial use of a very low-end, entry-level “beginner” saw.

  4. Jonas Jensen

    I strongly urge you to make your opinion heard in this matter.
    There are probably not many woodworkers among the members of such a commission, so they will believe what the lobbyists tell them.
    It is also one of the advantages of living in a democracy, that you are allowed to make your opinion heard without fearing prosecution, so please use your rights as a citizen in this matter.
    Brgds
    Jonas

    1. cmmullins

      Government should not get involved with a decision like this. Saws that cut wood are inherently dangerious and requires the operator should have a minimum of knowledge in their operation. The courts will force any dangerious devices be removed from the market. Government always get in the way to a goodresulation and increase costs dramatically.

      1. Jonas Jensen

        I agree with you, but I think that it will be very hard to get the CSPC to drop the matter completely, but if enough sensible woodworkers write a sincere letter and stating that there is no need for a change in the regulations, then perhaps a change can be avoided.

        I don’t know how many comments such a commission normally get, but I don’t think it is a lot, since these days it seems like an enormous task to write a normal letter and find an envelop and a stamp, then take it to the mail box etc. So everyone that really take the time to do it, probably represents 1000 who have the same opinion.

        By the way, it is really not my “problem”, since I live in Denmark, but the issue is very interesting.

        I agree with Fred Krueger, but the problem is with committees and legislators that they have to justify their existence, so they simply can’t say: OK the law system is perfect now, you might as well fire us.
        That is why they make all sorts of small changes, and sadly most of these are for the worse.

        But again, we should consider ourselves lucky to live in countries, where we are allowed to have doubts about the government and even write about those doubts.
        Have a nice weekend
        Jonas

COMMENT