Where in the world is Adam?

As many of you recall, I took sabbatical from my day job in 2007. I was recalled in 2008. I’m currently on assignment away from home and shop. Guys, like it or not, our nation is at war. And just because no one’s asked you to give up your nylon stockings (Hey! They’re MOSTLY cotton) doesn’t mean others aren’t making sacrifices. No, I don’t mean me. I live a privileged life in the worst of times. I’m just happy to help whenever and wherever I can. I’m not in harm’s way. Let’s just leave it like that, can we? I’ll tell you more when I can.

I’m presently working on another article for my column, but I won’t be able to write every issue. So we’ve found some folks I think you’ll enjoy hearing from. Norm Abram has graciously agreed to…¦no, just kidding. I’ll let Chris talk about what we have in store for you.

Adam

14 thoughts on “Where in the world is Adam?

  1. Richard Seabrease

    Adam,

    Thank you for all the great information you have given to me about woodworking. I really treasure your articles in Popular Woodworking and hope that you are able to do more such writing in the future. I thank you for your service to our country. My regret is that I have never met you in person to shake your hand and say thank you.

    Sincerely,
    Richard

  2. Steve McDaniel

    Adam,
    Thank you for your service to us and our nation. I’ll keep you in my prayers. I’ll miss your articles, and I’ve learned from you, but right now you’re doing a more noble and important thing.
    In your absence, like others on this blog, I too am interested in the article about Thomas Day. He and his brother John Day are an inspiration to me, as it seems that they both did what they needed to do to to serve God despite being in an environment that would tend to oppress them. For that reason, I am particularly interested in the furniture that Thomas created. Here’s a web page that describes some of what they’ve done:

    http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncccha/biographies/thomasday.html

    It helps me appreciate the legacy of furniture that has been left to us when I know more about the people who made that furniture.

    Steve
    Romans 8:1

  3. Al Navas

    We hope you will be safe, Adam. And I look forward to the new guys in the stockings!

    In the meantime, on January 11, 2010, I will be posting an edited version of your presentation at Woodworking in America, Valley Forge edition. I hope my editing skills do not disappoint, for your presentation on the joinery planes was outstanding!

    — Al Navas

  4. Jonas H. Jensen

    Stay safe Adam. We’ll be looking forward to hearing from you when the time is right again.

    Jonas

  5. Chuck Nickerson

    Adam – glad everything is OK. Looking forward to your return.

    Jerome is an excellent choice!

    Chuck

  6. Jim Campbell

    Adam, I hope all is well. We are the lucky ones having people of your caliber out there.

    I’ll keep a pot of coffee ready should you need some.

    Jim

  7. Stuart Hough

    I’m very happy to see that Jerome Bias has been chosen to "guest" on this column! I met Jerome at the WIA in Valley Forge and found him to be a very down-to-earth, personable and knowledgeable guy. I didn’t realize at the time I was in the company of greatness, but I enjoyed our meeting him the night before the conference, when we both tried to sneak a peek at the booths. Good luck and happy writing, Jerome!

  8. Christopher Schwarz

    We’re going to publish everything Adam can give us. But we’re lining up people to help fill in. In the next issue, I’m writing about Roubo’s try square.

    For April, we’ve lined up Jerome Bias to write about Thomas Day, the cabinetmaker he interprets:

    http://jeromebiasfurnituremaker.com/Bio/JBFM_bio.html

    We’re also lining up Dean Jansa and perhaps Peter Follansbee to walk a mile in Adam’s stockings.

    Chris

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