Chris Schwarz's Blog

The Official WIA Slideshow

Though I attended our 2010 Woodworking in America conference last weekend, I didn’t really see it.

Except for a short 30-minute visit to the Marketplace floor on Saturday, I spent most of the weekend cooped up in rooms four and five of the Northern Kentucky Convention Center teaching classes. (I have only myself to blame because I developed the teaching schedule.)

So on Monday it was a real blast to see a bunch of the photos of the conference taken by my friend Narayan Nayar with his trusty Leica. He culled through several gigabytes of images and uploaded a nice set of 35 photos that capture the flavor of the event.

You can view the slideshow here on the blog by clicking the image above, or you can see the photos in much larger form in a nice Flickr slideshow by clicking here.

For next year’s show (details forthcoming), I’m going to plan to teach less and wander more. Heck, I didn’t even have time to give Patrick Leach any more of my money during WIA. Luckily, I will remedy that situation on Thursday when I head down to the Mid-West Tool Collectors annual meeting in Louisville.

– Christopher Schwarz

Other Woodworking in America Coverage

– If you want to be the first to find out about the details, dates and location of the 2011 Woodworking in America Conference, you should sign up for the conference’s newsletter at WoodworkingInAmerica.com.

– Al Navas has started his coverage of the event on his blog. He always posts the most about the conference, so keep checking back here.

– Wilbur Pan has posted some of his thoughts on WIA here.

6 thoughts on “The Official WIA Slideshow

  1. Narayan

    Tony, Kari–thanks.

    I’m using a Leica M9. Most days of the conference I brought only two lenses–a 28mm Summicron ASPH and a 50mm Summilux ASPH (I think I have one shot with a 90mm Elmarit).

    The Leica Ms are my "handtool" for photography. Though they are digital, everything about taking a picture of them is manual–focus, exposure, "zoom" (which is done by moving your feet). I’ve had various pro and semi-pro cameras in the past, and much like shoving a board through a CNC router, I feel removed from the process and don’t care much for the technically perfect but sterile results. Rangefinders, like handtools, make me feel like I’m still a relevant part of the picture taking process and that some skill is in fact involved.

    Also, much like the woodworking tools I love to use most, Leica cameras and lenses are made and assembled largely by hand by highly-skilled technicians, some of whom I’ve met in person.

    Anyway, much has been written about this. If you’re a gadget freak, this is a good article: http://bit.ly/9taaDw . If you’re a photographer, try this one: http://bit.ly/aXcGUH

    Tony, there wasn’t a lot of available light. Some shutter speeds were 1/8s. I shot mostly above 800ISO. If you want more info on any photograph, view it on its photograph page and use "view EXIF info" under the actions menu.

    Lastly, you might like photos taken from previous WIAs:

    http://bit.ly/91MHOE
    http://bit.ly/a6yrSN

    Cheers.

  2. Tony

    Narayan, what Leica body and lens are you using? The lighting must have been great to use available light in these pics! Great job!

  3. Corey Megal

    Chris, I had a blast at WIA. Thanks for taking a moment to let me get a picture with you. I sat through a couple of your sessions and the information was great. I especially enjoyed learning your technique for sharpening a curved iron. Great stuff and great job by you and your staff. I’ll start saving now for next year.

    Corey

  4. Ethan

    Don’t worry, Chris. Patrick saw me coming and knows my affinity for all things related to beading and inlay.

    I walked away with a nice Preston string router with an original blade in it…

    Stupid Patrick Leach.

  5. dave rodgers

    I did not see any pictures of the T-shirt. If you have any left over, how about a T-shirt for the 4 finalists in the slogan contest?

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