Chris Schwarz's Blog

The Lie-Nielsen ‘Planing Arm’

For the Lie-Nielsen fan who has everything, you might consider getting a Lie-Nielsen tattoo for the arm that pushes your bronze and ductile iron beauties.

Casual Lie-Nielsen fans can purchase the temporary tattoos Lie-Nielsen Toolworks sells at its web site ($5 for 10 of them). Or you can go all the way and get a permanent tattoo, like Rob Giovannetti of Illinois.

Giovannetti’s wife is an accomplished tattoo artist. He loves handplanes. And so the natural result was this tattoo on his right arm.

Giovannetti showed off his tattoo on his new blog, Cherry Creek Woodworks. Knowing him, this won’t be the last outrageous thing he does there.

And this isn’t the first tool tattoo I’ve seen. About five years ago, one of the demonstrators in the Festool booth at a trade show had Festool tattooed on his right forearm in the company’s bright green. The guy installed custom floors for a living. And if memory serves me right, he also had Festool emblazoned on his truck. And he even kept his firstborn in a Systainer for its first couple weeks of life. (OK, I made that last detail up.)

– Christopher Schwarz

6 thoughts on “The Lie-Nielsen ‘Planing Arm’

  1. Chris C

    Yeah, I’m with Bill. Let’s not get carried away. After
    all, like all companies they are a commercial enterprise
    whose core motivation is profit. As much as we might want
    to believe otherwise, no corporation has tear ducts with
    which to weep.

    This particular one is a double whammy for me: I don’t
    like commercial advertisements on me, and I don’t like
    somebody else’s name on me either.

    Chris

  2. Bill Satko

    I like my Lie Nielsen planes, but a tatoo is carrying brand loyalty too far. I guess they could say of me…"He’s just not that into you!"

  3. Bill

    Geez, I dunno. I mean, I can see meeting up with a nice young lady and getting married, having a couple of kids. But a tatoo? I mean – it’s so … permanent.

  4. Mike Holden

    Re: the guy with his kid in a systainer – maybe he thought it was a "skinner box" (grinnn)

    (Only those who took Psych 101 will get this, B.F. Skinner was a behavioral psycholgist who advocated raising children in a special box, aka "skinner box")

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