Turn a Coffee Scoop

This time on Woodturning with Tim Yoder, you’ll learn how to make a two-piece coffee scoop that will look beautiful in your kitchen or in a gift basket for family or friends.

Tim starts by laying out the parts, using a piece of curly maple for the bowl and walnut for the handle. After bandsawing each piece to rough shape, it’s time to head to the lathe.

First, he mounts the bowl blank between centers and rounds it. He uses a heavy-duty roughing gouge because it’s less likely to bounce around when working against the grain of the figured maple.

Once the bowl blank is fairly round, he cuts a tenon on end so he can hold the blank in a chuck for detailed work. Watch closely for the neat trick Tim uses to cut and size the tenon in one step.

After the blank is mounted firmly in the chuck, he uses a spindle gouge to clean up the outside diameter of the bowl, then he hollows the inside. Here, Tim has another clever trick to help size the inside of the bowl so it will contain just the right amount of coffee when it’s used. (Can you say ball bearings?)

When the inside is finished, Tim uses a sweptback spindle gouge to shape the outside and then drills a hole for the handle, completes the shape, sands inside and out, and parts the bowl from the lathe.

Then, it’s time to turn the handle. Tim mounts the blank between centers and shapes it, again starting with a roughing gouge. When the handle blank is round, he cuts a tenon on the end with a parting gouge and then shapes beads and a gentle cove with a spindle gouge. The key here: Tim works from the tailstock to the headstock. That way, there’s plenty of mass to support the handle as he thins it to final shape.

To complete the project, Tim sands the handle and parts it off. Then he cleans up the ends of both pieces, glues on the handle and the scoop is ready for a mineral oil finish.

This is a project you can easily finish in less than an hour. And you’re sure to be pleased with the result when you’re done.

Kevin Ireland

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