Woodworking Hand Tools

Here you’ll discover the best hand tool woodworking advice directly from the experts. We cover everything you need to know to improve your hand tool woodworking techniques and make more informed decisions about choosing and using hand tools. From simple sawing techniques to smart strategies for tackling tricky grain with a handplane or card scraper, Popular Woodworking’s best are to share their many years of experience and make you a better woodworker.

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5 Must-build FREE Project Plans!

When I started work at Popular Woodworking in 1996, the goal was to cram as many projects into each issue as possible. No techniques. No tool reviews. Just 17 to 20 projects. Oh, and we couldn’t use outside authors to help. As a result, we were building all day, everyday. And we were always...

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Get a Groat in Your Throat

When it comes to pushing our handplanes, I think we are candy-bottomed wussies compared to the joiners of the 17th century. We are obsessed with how thin a shaving we can make. Early joiners, however, wanted to take the thickest, gnarliest shaving possible for the tool, the bench and his or her arms. For...

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Czeck Edge Goes Carbide

In preparing to review the new Czeck Edge birdcage awl for the February issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine (find out how to get the electronic version free by clicking here), I asked Bob Zajicek (founder of Czeck Edge Tools) to also send his new Super Kadet II carbide marking knife. Because it is a (relatively)...

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Highly Recommended: Blue Spruce Joiner’s Mallet

Since leaving Popular Woodworking in June 2011, I have avoided writing tool reviews. In fact, I have been thrilled to focus my attention on other things. But I am coming out of retirement momentarily to discuss a tool that I have been waiting years – yes, years – for: the Blue Spruce Toolworks Joiner’s...

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A Jack Plane with a Rounded Sole

When preparing stock by hand, the most useful plane is probably the jack plane (sometimes called the fore plane among joiners). Its curved iron allows you to remove a remarkable amount of material with every stroke. I usually travel with a metal jack (an old Stanley No. 5) because it’s less intimidating in a...

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Veritas Shooting Plane

By Charles Bender page 16 Just as with all the planes Veritas produces, its shooting plane is sleek, well thought-out and ready to tackle the toughest jobs. With a weight of 7.7 pounds, the Veritas shooting plane gathers momentum quickly and slices through the end grain of even the most rock-hard exotics. But despite...

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Movie: Cutting Saw Teeth on a Hand-cranked Retoother

There is always something going on at The Woodwright’s School in Pittsboro, N.C. Today as Roy Underhill and I were rehearsing to shoot two shows of the “The Woodwright’s Shop,” Tom Calisto was teaching a class at the school on making a dovetail saw. During a break in the action, Tom show me how...

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A Router Accessory you Can’t Have – Yet

Last month, I spent a few days inlaying about 40 pieces of brass hardware that all required recesses of different depths. My small Lie-Nielsen router plane did most of the work, but by the end of the job I was a bit frustrated. Unlike its bigger brother, the small router plane doesn’t have a...