Tool Test: Lie-Nielsen Violin Maker’s Plane

In the August 2012 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine (which mails to subscribers on June 13), you’ll find a review of the Lie-Nielsen Toolworks Violin Maker’s Plane (also called the 101), which is based loosely on the Stanley 101. I filmed the short video below to show how the plane comes apart, goes back together, adjusts and works.

To learn all about handplanes, from block planes to specialty and joinery planes, check out “Handplane Essentials” by Christopher Schwarz – it’s available in both print and iPad-optimized eBook formats.

— Megan Fitzpatrick

 

4 thoughts on “Tool Test: Lie-Nielsen Violin Maker’s Plane

  1. Barquester

    It doesn’t look all that useful for a violin maker, it’s doesn’t have a rounded bottom and it’s too big. But not big enough for when I need a big one. Unless it had a toothed blade then I would buy it.

    1. Megan Fitzpatrick Post author

      I’ve checked out a number of luthier sites’ discussion boards, and many of the instruments makers thereupon seem to agree that this plane would be useful for shooting fingerboards and the like, and for other small detail work – and for making bows. But for curved detail work, a convex sole would be better. Also,in looking at Denis Diderot’s plate that shows small instrument makers’ planes, it appears that one could grind and hone a significant camber on the blade for curved work – though the tight mouth of the LN 101 may preclude that approach. (Those plates, BTW, can be seen here: http://www.theprintscollector.com/Item.aspx?ItemId=e6cd0fcb-9ccc-4d3a-b41d-7b003036d393&mmType=New (click on “Tools for making bowed instruments -1
      2 of 3″ for a closer look). No matter what you call it though, it is a nice plane for detail work in the flat world.

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