Veneer Techniques

Benson sideboard 1

Complicated Grain Patterns No Match for Veneering

Have you ever wanted to make a table top or cabinet door using several types of woods with the grain flowing in different directions? After seeing the vision in your mind or on paper you soon realize that there might be two problems with construction of your beautiful design. Joining several types of woods...

Top closed. With the hinged top folded closed,
the piece serves as a chest of drawers. Notice
my veneer repair in the lower left-hand corner
of the top.

The Thick & Thin of Veneer Repair

Veneer is just thin wood – so don’t be afraid of it. by Bob Flexner from the November 2009 issue, #179 I love repairing old furniture – the older the better. I find repairing more challenging and satisfying than making new because someone else, or time and age, has set the parameters within which...


Soup Up a Veneer Saw with Mario Rodriguez

Once at a woodworking show, I witnessed Frank Pollaro making up veneered chess boards. He must have produced more than 30 pieces and each was perfect. The seams were tight and clean; there was no tear-out or split veneer. What impressed me most was that he was getting these results straight from his veneer...


Shop-sawn Veneers: A Primer

Heather Trosdahl’s article in the Dec. 2012 issue, “Parquetry Tabletop,” requires shop-sawn veneers for the best results. In case sawing one’s own veneer is a technique with which you’re unfamiliar, she’s shared her methods below: • Install an appropriate blade for re-sawing. Fully tension the blade, using the 1/8″ rule. That is, the flesh...


Three Ways to Joint Veneer Edges

To join veneer edges together, they need to be straight and true – just like when gluing up solid lumber. Gaps are not allowed. Granted, veneer edges are not glued in the same way as solid lumber, but are taped together to form a wider piece, called a veneer face. There are a number...