Handplane Techniques

The handplane is perhaps the most recognizable symbol of all that is hand tool woodworking; of all that is finely crafted from Earth’s most durable renewable resource. Look no furthur for your handplane essentials than right here. Learn handplane techniques that have been passed down through the generations from woodworkers who were crafting the finest furniture on earth before the advent of electricity. Whether you’re a professional or hobbiest, and handtool nerd or a power tool pro, the handplane has a place in your shop.

Coming Soon: Grind, Hone & Get Back to Work

The best sharpening advice I ever heard was from Tony Konovalov: Grind, hone and get back to work. Or, to put it another way: Which is more fun? Making your tools sharp or making your tools dull? When it comes to sharpening tools, I am not meditative. I am not slow. I am not...

5-minute Cavetto Moulding

I made some cavetto moulding for a version of The Schoolbox I’m building. And because a cavetto is one of the easiest mouldings to make with a round plane, I decided to demonstrate the basics of laying out this moulding using a No. 4 plane. Cavetto, which means “to hollow,” is sometime called a...

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John Wilson’s Adjustable-pitch Plane

If you had only one bench plane, it would be nice if that plane could do both roughing and smoothing chores. Woodworker John Wilson tackled that problem in our April 2011 issue with his adjustable-pitch jack plane, which can be switched from 45° pitch to 52° pitch in less than a minute. I’ve had...

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Evapo-Rust a Friend to Vintage Tools

I love “before” and “after” photos of things. This week I picked up a nice 3/16” side-bead plane from Josh Clark (aka Hyperkitten). The tool is a gem. The boxing is perfect. The sole is straight. The wedge fits great and the iron’s profile is the right shape and is – gasp – sharp....

Thanks, Mr. Dead Guy

I don’t get to read much fiction anymore, but I do read old woodworking books almost every night (last night I finished the potboiler “Cabinet Construction” (1937) edited by the great J.C.S. Brough). And the reason I keep reading these books – even basic ones – is that there are gems to be found....

Highly Recommended: Catharine Kennedy

This morning has been frustrating. I’ve been scouring the shop for my bradawl, which I’ve owned for ages, but it’s just plain gone. And earlier this fall, one of our students accidentally took my favorite claw hammer home with him (he returned it). And I also lost the very first Starrett 6″ rule I...