Tricks of the Trade

dovetial jig

Do Double-duty with a Dovetail Jig

I was intrigued with Nick Engler’s Ingenious Jigs article from December 2001 that showed you how to make a jig for cutting perfect dados in the sides of case pieces. After my last project, where the routing was the most repetitious and boring part of the piece, I thought there should be an easier...

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How-to Draw Accurate Lines Around Corners

Many years ago my carpenter square mysteriously disappeared at the start of my basement finishing project. So I started using a butt hinge to mark lumber. It worked better than I had hoped. My carpenter square is still hiding from me, but I still use a 31⁄2″ x 31⁄2″ full-mortise butt hinge for transferring...

forstner dovetail pins

Make Forstner-powered Dovetail Pins

Chiseling and paring away the waste between dovetail pins can be largely eliminated by using a Forstner bit to remove the waste. Set up a Forstner bit (the diameter equal to your drawer side thickness) in your drill press and set the depth stop to just shy of the bottom layout line. Drill into...

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How to Sharpen Dull Router Bits

Most shops have two types of router bits – dull and sharp ones. It’s easy to tell the difference because the sharp bits ease through the wood while the dull bits labor. Sometimes a good cleaning is all the bit needs. Any good blade solvent will rid bits of pitch and resin. Once the...

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Tricks of the Trade: Table Saw Extension

Edited by Kari Hultman Pages: 12-13 From the February 2012 issue #195. Buy the issue now. Three main design features enable it to work well. The runners are made of hard maple that resists wear and tear. The sliding mechanism is a dovetail that allows the roller to move closer to the table for short pieces and...

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Tricks of the Trade

A Simple Toothing Plane By Kari Hultman Pages: 16-17 From the October 2011 issue #192 Buy the issue now For 35 years I’ve used toothing planes on veneers, especially ones with swirling grain. With sawn veneers, the toother is the fastest way to make them flat (but not smooth). The pattern made by the plane increases...