October 2013

8_Chair Seat

2013 Popular Woodworking Magazine Favs – Part 2

In a continuation of selecting my favorite articles from the issues of 2013 (read part 1 here), below covers the August (issue #205) through December (issue #208) for the year. My hands-down winner from the August 2014 issue is the article written by Mario Rodriguez, “Take a U-turn to Scoop a Chair Seat.” Jigs...

compass0111

Compass Layout Tricks from October 2013 Issue

In the October 2013 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine, you’ll find my Woodworking Essentials article, “The Mighty Compass.” In the article I show a bunch of things you can do with a compass to create polygons and divide lines and angles. The following video shows some of the layout techniques from the article, in...

01pwm1013shakerchest

Shaker Blanket Chest

This piece from White Water Village shows a Southern influence.By Megan Fitzpatrick Pages 24-31 Buy This Issue NowA typical for Shaker blanket chests, this piece (a near replica of an extant example built at Union Village and now at the White Water Shaker Village) has half-blind dovetails on all corners. The layout – side...

01pwm1013bookstand

Joined (& Adorned) Bookstand

Simple carvings transform scraps into a 17th-century-style work of art.By Peter Follansbee Pages 37-41 Buy This Issue NowScraps, offcuts, shorts and odds and ends are bits of wood that accumulate around the shops of most woodworkers I know. Reminiscent of Donald Hall’s book, “String Too Short to Be Saved,” they are a lignin guilt trip,...

01pwm1013dutchchest

Dutch Tool Chest

This traditional traveling chest is faster and easier to build than a floor chest.By Christopher Schwarz Pages 42-47 Buy This Issue NowNot everyone has the time, materials or skills to build a full-scale traditional floor chest, which can have as many as 100 dovetails and banks of precisely fit sliding trays.And while I’m a fan...

Installed Koshi-do

Kōshi-Do

A new entrance to a master’s studio comes from the beginning of his career.By Toshio Odate Pages 48-52 Buy This Issue NowThe kōshi-do form (a latticed door) has existed since ancient times in Japanese temples, and has long been used to divide the exterior and interior, and sometimes as a room divider.Slide Show: More...