November 2004

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Out of the Woodwork: To Rip or to Split?

Sometimes sawing isn’t the smartest solution. By Jim Tolpin Page: 108 From the November 2004 issue #144 Buy this issue now When I lived in Pennsylvania, an Appalachian furniture maker I met gave me this mystery to solve: “Back near the turn of the last century, the new fire chief of Cumberland, Md., decided...

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Flexner on Finishing: Fixing Finish with French Polish

Sometimes it’s a good technique for repairing damaged finishes. By Bob Flexner Pages: 102-104 From the November 2004 issue #144 Buy this issue now In the woodworking community, French polishing is usually thought of as a technique for finishing new wood. But in the repair community, French polishing is commonly used to renew worn...

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At the Lathe: Sharpening for Woodturners

Turning tools come in many shapes. Here’s how to keep those shapes sharp. By Judy Ditmer Pages: 97-99 From the November 2004 issue #144 Buy this issue now Many years ago, I was cooking with a friend who was home visiting his parents during a college break. He struggled with a dull knife until...

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Power-tool Joinery: Table Saw Tenon Jig

A simple and inexpensive accessory that will cut accurate joints. By Bill Hylton Pages: 94-96 From the November 2004 issue #144 Buy this issue now The mortise and tenon is one of those fundamental joints you’re obligated to master. It’s used for building frames of all sorts (including post-and-beam architectural frames), as well as...

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Insidious Mistakes

There are many things we do wrong but we don’t know they’re wrong. By the Popular Woodworking staff Pages: 88-92 From the November 2004 issue #144 Buy this issue now In woodworking there are two kinds of mistakes: There’s the garden-variety gaffe where we simply cut a board too short or botch a dimension,...

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The Ruler Trick

Radically reduce the time it takes to prepare and sharpen a plane iron with the help of a $5 steel ruler. By David Charlesworth Pages: 82-86 From the November 2004 issue #144 Buy this issue now I have been teaching furniture making for more than 27 years and am convinced that most amateurs are...

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Shaker Tripod Table

Although delicate, this graceful table should provide years of service in your home. By Kerry Pierce Pages: 76-81 From the November 2004 issue #144 Buy this issue now Several years ago while teaching a chairmaking class at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking, I thanked Mario Rodriguez (who was teaching a hand-tool class at...