Nick Engler

Finger Joint Jig

Finger Joint Jig Sketchup Model

This is a model of a microadjustable finger joint jig featured in an article in the January 2004 issue of Popular Woodworking magazine. Project design and construction by Nick Engler, SketchUp model by reader Bruce Beatty. View the Google SketchUp Model. View all of the Woodworking SketchUp Drawings. Purchase the January 2004 issue of Popular...

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Woodworking Essentials: Edge & Surface Treatments

By Nick Engler Pages: 45-52 From the June 2004 issue #141 Buy this issue now Routers were developed to cut moulded shapes in wood. Although their workshop role has expanded (greatly) during the last century to include joinery and other operations, moulding is still what they do best. They remain the chief woodworking tools...

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Ingenious Jigs: Flexible Fence Fixture

This accessory will rise to the occasion to make cuts safer and easier. By Nick Engler Pages: 28-30 From the June 2004 issue #141 Buy this issue now Now and again you may have to turn a board on its edge to work it – cutting a groove, drilling a series of holes in...

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Ingenious Jigs: A Jig for Precision Trimming

Turn your laminate trimmer into a tool that flushes surfaces with incredible finesse. By Nick Engler Pages: 34-35 From the April 2004 issue #140 Buy this issue now Once upon a time I had the brilliant idea to use a strip of hardwood to trim out the edge of a laminate countertop. And not...

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The Joint Maker

This horizontal router jig has a table that slides in four directions, turning a router into a joint-making monster. By Nick Engler Pages: 77-83 From the February 2004 issue #139 Buy this issue now This horizontal routing jig, which I call “Joint Maker,” holds the router to one side of the work. This setup...

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Woodworking Essentials: Router Joinery

By Nick Engler Pages: 49-56 From the February 2004 issue #139 Buy this issue now Although routers were originally designed to create moulded shapes, they can be excellent joinery tools. In fact, they’re better in some ways than table saws, professional-quality mortisers or dado cutters when it comes to cutting joints. There are several...