February 2004

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Woodworking Essentials: Router Joinery

By Nick Engler Pages: 49-56 From the February 2004 issue #139 Buy this issue now Although routers were originally designed to create moulded shapes, they can be excellent joinery tools. In fact, they’re better in some ways than table saws, professional-quality mortisers or dado cutters when it comes to cutting joints. There are several...

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Eames-style Table

A great way to try cold-bending, learn a new band-saw trick and fire up the hand-held power planer. By Christopher Schwarz Pages: 42-48 From the February 2004 issue #139 Buy this issue now Almost any discussion of the legendary furniture designs of Charles and Ray Eames begins with plywood that has been formed into...

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Power-tool Joinery: The Case for Case Miters

These joints look great. Cutting and clamping them is the real trick. By Bill Hylton Pages: 38-40 From the February 2004 issue #139 Buy this issue now What joint would you use at the corners of a case? If appearance is a consideration – when is it not? – you definitely don’t want an...

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Great Woodshops: Carving for CEO

Visit the 3 shops of David Monhollen, who shed a successful career in sales to carve wildlife for executives. By Kara Gebhart Pages: 34-36 From the February 2004 issue #139 Buy this issue now David Monhollen has three woodshops. His first shop is decidedly bigger than yours. His second shop (his so-called “working” shop)...

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Out on a Limb: Join the Club or Get Some Class

By Steve Shanesy Page: 10 From the February 2004 issue #139 Buy this issue now One drawback to woodworking is that it tends to be a solitary activity. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy my time alone in the shop, away from all the stress of my “other world.” And to some degree, this...