Arts & Mysteries

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Arts & Mysteries: 18th-Century Stock Preparation

Different goals allowed period woodworkers to surface boards quickly. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 32-35 From the April 2007 issue #161 Buy this issue now Dressing stock by hand isn’t hard work. The trick to doing it efficiently is forgetting everything you know about woodworking machines and just about everything you’ve read on the Internet....

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Arts & Mysteries: The Soul and Basis of Our Art

How to design furniture like an 18th-century cabinetmaker. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 30-33 From the February 2007 issue #160 Buy this issue now I realize the way I work wood is a bit out of the ordinary. It’s also true that the way I write magazine articles is out of the ordinary. Unlike typical...

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Arts & Mysteries: 18th-century Chairmaking

Building a Philadelphia Chippendale chair – Part 2 By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-28 From the December 2008 issue #173 Buy this issue now This is part two in my series of what will probably be several articles detailing the construction of a formal Philadelphia Chippendale chair. In the last article, I built up the...

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Arts & Mysteries: 18th-century Chairmaking

Building a Philadelphia Chippendale chair – part 1 By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-28 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now There are few pieces of furniture more difficult to build than a formal chair. The structural requirements of any chair are tricky. But when curvilinear elements and angles are introduced, the...

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Arts & Mysteries: A Joynt Forme

This 17th-century seating piece is good practice for what came after. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-28 From the October 2008 issue #171 Buy this issue now I’m going to take a step back in time this month to explore the ubiquitous seating of the 17th century. I think you’ll find this to be a...

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Arts & Mysteries: 18th-century Chairmaking

Building a ‘Rush Bottum’d Chaire’ – part 2 By Adam Cherubini Pages: 22-25 From the August 2008 issue #170 Buy this issue now In the last issue of Popular Woodworking, I began making my first chair. I turned the back legs, and I shaped and bent the slats to make a “ladder-back” type chair....

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Arts & Mysteries: 18th-century Chairmaking

Building a ‘Rush Bottum’d Chaire’ – part 1 By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-27 From the June 2008 issue #169 Buy this issue now I’m going to turn my attention to chairmaking for a while. I’ve been hesitant to make chairs because they are fairly difficult to build, and frankly, I didn’t feel I was...

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Arts & Mysteries: Junk to Jewel

How to turn cheap wooden planes into workshop treasures. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 26-28 From the April 2008 issue #168 Buy this issue now Never before have such a wide variety of handplanes been available to woodworkers. If you’re looking for a new plane, but aren’t sure which one to buy, I recommend an...

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Arts & Mysteries: 18th-century Tools for Every Shop

Often, the old ways are more efficient. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 26-29 From the February 2008 issue #167 Buy this issue now I use 18th-century hand tools because I make reproduction furniture. In my mind, the simplest, most efficient way to make authentic-looking furniture is to simply use the tools and techniques from the...