Arts & Crafts Style

QSWO_MTCH_1458

Quartersawn White Oak Grain Matching

I once worked with a guy who maintained that white oak wasn’t suited for furniture and that whiskey barrels are a far better use for this wood. Looking at the pile of wood in the photo you might be inclined to agree with that, and there are days when I find myself leaning in...

Limbert No. 346 Magazine stand

Limbert Magazine Stand in the Spirit of “I Can Do That”

The magazine stand is one of the signature pieces of the American Arts and Crafts movement, and Charles Limbert’s No. 346 is an especially distinctive take on the form. Two details mark the No. 346 as a Limbert design—the cutouts on the sides and the trapezoidal base. In the spirit of “I Can Do...

SDFCF_sq

Bob Lang’s Books Now in the Popular Woodworking Store

I came to work at Popular Woodworking Magazine in a roundabout way. I spent most of my adult life working with wood professionally, and along the way I read a lot of books and magazines. I was passionate about furniture of the Arts & Crafts period, and wished there was a book of measured...

IMG_1494

New Video: Bob Lang and the Voysey Mantle Clock

The cover project for the upcoming August 2013 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine is like many of the pieces I’ve made for articles. Picking projects is one of the best parts of my job and when I meet readers, one of the common questions asked is “How do you guys decide what pieces to...

Gustav Stickley Tabouret

Arts & Crafts Furniture Details Made Easy

At this year’s Woodworking in America conferences, I’ll be talking about and demonstrating how to make Arts & Crafts period furniture. It’s a popular style among woodworkers, but the history of the period and what details are significant are not well understood. We’re not even sure what to call it, and it goes by...

East Tennessee chairmaker Curtis Buchanan was invited to show this bold design, which mixes the Windsor chairs he usually builds with the chairs he teaches as part of the GreenWood Project.

Should Furniture Be Judged?

Recently I had the privilege of serving as one of the judges for an upcoming furniture exhibition of the Cumberland Furniture Guild, a group of mostly Tennessee furniture makers (full disclosure: I’m also a member and on the board the Guild.) Having been on the maker’s side of the “judging” process, I know that submitting...