Article Index Bill Hylton

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Power-tool Joinery: Breadboard Ends Keep Tops Flat

This traditional joint ensures the only cup on your tabletop will have coffee in it. By Bill Hylton Pages: 78-80 From the October 2006 issue #157 Buy this issue now The breadboard end is a traditional device for preventing a broad panel such as a tabletop from cupping. It is a narrow strip of...

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Power-tool Joinery: Keep Your Tabletops Flat

Battens: Just one proven method to keep you on a level playing field. By Bill Hylton Pages: 23-25 From the August 2006 issue #156 Buy this issue now The best way to keep a tabletop flat is to make it flat in the first place and to attach it properly to a rigid frame,...

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Power-tool Joinery

Use your router to join wood along simple and complex curves. By Bill Hylton Pages: 36-39 From the June 2006 issue #155 Buy this issue now If you rip a board in two, you can easily rejoin the pieces along the line of the cut. But you can’t rejoin two pieces that have been...

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Power-tool Joinery

Tricks and procedures for perfect tool setups. By Bill Hylton Pages: 84-86 From the April 2006 issue #154 Buy this issue now When you are using power tools for cutting parts and joinery, accuracy has less to do with laying out individual workpieces and more to do with mastering setups. I have a simple...

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Power-tool Joinery: Half-Blind Dovetails by Jig

Not everyone’s ready to tackle hand-cut dovetails. Here’s how to get the most from your router and jig. By Bill Hylton Pages: 92-94 From the  February 2006 issue #153 Buy this issue now Dovetails are prime joints. Long history, great appearance and cachet. Used in boxes, drawers and carcases. But for many woodworkers, cutting...

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Power-tool Joinery: Beaded Face Frames

Discover how to join rails and stiles when you just can’t cope. By Bill Hylton Pages: 90-92 From the April 2007 issue #161 Buy this issue now Sticking is the profile cut on the edge of a frame’s rails and stiles. These days, we generally cut such profiles on the router table, and most...

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Power-tool Joinery: Sliding Dovetails

Strong and versatile, this joint is simple to make with a router. By Bill Hylton Pages: 30-32 From the December 2004 issue #145 Buy this issue now For the woodworker who builds furniture and cabinets, the sliding dovetail is a joint well worth mastering. It’s strong and versatile, with myriad applications, from case construction...

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Power-tool Joinery: Table Saw Tenon Jig

A simple and inexpensive accessory that will cut accurate joints. By Bill Hylton Pages: 94-96 From the November 2004 issue #144 Buy this issue now The mortise and tenon is one of those fundamental joints you’re obligated to master. It’s used for building frames of all sorts (including post-and-beam architectural frames), as well as...

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Power-tool Joinery: Router-made Mortises & Tenons

There are many ways to make this joint, but none is better than with the router. By Bill Hylton Pages: 34-36 From the October 2004 issue #143 Buy this issue now The traditional way to make a mortise is to chop it out with a chisel and mallet; the matching tenon is cut with...