Article Index Arts Mysteries

Arts & Mysteries: Tool Chest Case Construction

Do 18th-century tools and techniques always work for modern pieces? By Adam Cherubini Pages 58-59 I’m in the middle of the construction of a machinist’s-style chest to hold some of my smaller or modern woodworking tools. My goal with this project was to recognize the tool-storage needs of the majority of woodworkers and build something that would...

Arts & Mysteries: A Chest for Every Woodworker

Design your tool storage from the inside out. By Adam Cherubini Pages 54-56 I currently store my woodworking tools in a traditional cabinetmaker’s/joiner’s tool chest. In building that chest, I leaned heavily on surviving period chests as well as images dating from the period. Over the years I’ve been an advocate for these sorts of chests. But...

Moritsing by Hand

Arts & Myteries: Mortising by Hand

The key to a lasting joint is a good fit – or good pegs. By Adam Cherubini Pages 20-22 Frankly, I can do without dovetails quite nicely. You can nail two boards together and be left with something strong and serviceable. But mortises are trickier to live without; you need to know how to cut them. Mortises join...

Arts & Mysteries: Sweat the Details

Small touches make a big difference in 'boarded furniture.' by Adam Cherubini Pages 18-20 This article is part three in a series I’m doing on boarded furniture. If you are new to the series, boarded furniture is a style of case construction prevalent in early America, but largely ignored by we modern woodworkers. It is defined by...

Arts & Mysteries: ‘Boarded’ Furniture

London’s clever carpenters found a way around the laws. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 22-24 From the February 2012 issue #195 Buy the issue now. “Boarded” is an archaic English term that was used to describe a form of woodwork characterized by the use of fasteners as the principle means of attachment. The iconic six-board chest is probably the...

Arts & Mysteries: Whetstone Sharpening

Part 1: No flat back. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-25 From the October 2011 issue #192 Buy this issue now I’ve tried most sharpening systems. I started with sandpaper and glass because it was cost-effective. It’s still tough to beat. You don’t have to worry about maintenance. If the paper rips or clogs, you throw it...