Article Index Arts Mysteries

A&M

Lighting Matters

Raking light through windows is the clear winner in a hand-tool shop. by Peter Follansbee page 60 In 2007, I was a speaker at Colonial Williamsburg’s Furniture Forum, and there I met Adam Cherubini. He was in costume in the parking lot, talking period furniture and tools to anyone who’d listen. If you know...

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Don’t be Such a Square

Make a 45° miter square with help from dividers and a straightedge. by Bob Rozaieski pages 58-50 The very first lesson any woodworker learns is that precise work requires square corners. We ensure that stock is square before cutting any joinery. We check to make sure that casework is square during assembly. Almost everything...

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Arts & Mysteries: Small-shop Efficiencies

Simplification and organization are the keys to success. by Bob Rozaieski pages 22-24 I’ve worked in a small workshop for many years now. Many, if not most woodworkers, would classify my 7' x 13' space more as a closet than a workshop. In fact, I have seen some master-suite walk-ins that were indeed larger than my shop. The...

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Arts & Mysteries: Choose Your Woods Wisely

Materials matter more when it comes to hand tools. by Bob Rozaieski pages 58-60 As a result of the inherent beauty in the material, for some of today’s woodworkers, visual appeal is the primary consideration in construction. That’s because most machines can more easily overcome a board’s physical properties than a person using hand tools. Modern machinery...

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Arts & Mysteries: Logs to Lumber

With sweat equity and a few simple tools, you can split strong, stable stock. By Adam Cherubini Pages 60-61 Though sawn lumber was available to 17th- and 18th-century European woodworkers in Colonial America, many American craftsmen split wood to produce stock for furniture. Rive or split marks are typical of 17th-century furniture and not at all uncommon...

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Arts & Mysteries: Modern Chest, Period Methods

In the end, are period tools right for post-Industrial materials? By Adam Cherubini Pages 58-59 I began my machinist’s chest project with the intention of using it to commune with the greater modern woodworking world. I wasn’t kidding. The chest is designed to hold the miscellaneous tools that I think of as non-traditional, but in reality are...

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Arts & Mysteries: Tool Chest Case Construction

Do 18th-century tools and techniques always work for modern pieces? By Adam Cherubini Pages 58-59 I’m in the middle of the construction of a machinist’s-style chest to hold some of my smaller or modern woodworking tools. My goal with this project was to recognize the tool-storage needs of the majority of woodworkers and build something that would...

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Arts & Mysteries: A Chest for Every Woodworker

Design your tool storage from the inside out. By Adam Cherubini Pages 54-56 I currently store my woodworking tools in a traditional cabinetmaker’s/joiner’s tool chest. In building that chest, I leaned heavily on surviving period chests as well as images dating from the period. Over the years I’ve been an advocate for these sorts of chests. But...

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Arts & Myteries: Mortising by Hand

The key to a lasting joint is a good fit – or good pegs. By Adam Cherubini Pages 20-22 Frankly, I can do without dovetails quite nicely. You can nail two boards together and be left with something strong and serviceable. But mortises are trickier to live without; you need to know how to cut them. Mortises join...