Article Index Adam Cherubini

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What is an Oilstone?

The language surrounding so called oilstones is very misleading. First off, there’s no such thing as an “oilstone.” Long ago, these abrasive stones were simply called whetstones. “Whetting” was the period word for “sharpening” and it had nothing to do with applying liquid to a rock. Nor is oil required for their use. All...

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Arts & Mysteries: Whetstone Sharpening

Part 1: No flat back. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-25 From the October 2011 issue #192 Buy this issue now I’ve tried most sharpening systems. I started with sandpaper and glass because it was cost-effective. It’s still tough to beat. You don’t have to worry about maintenance. If the paper rips or clogs, you throw it...

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Arts & Mysteries: The Lost Arts & Mysteries

Revealing centuries-old secrets to working quickly and efficiently. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 32-36 From the December 2005 issue #152 Buy this issue now Arts & Mysteries is a phrase that oft appears in the contracts or indentures between master craftsmen and their apprentices. Exact usage varies, but the context is usually something like “…...

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The Anthony Hay Cabinet Shop

A look at Williamsburg’s period shop through the eyes of a passionate hand-tool woodworker. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 66-69 From the November 2005 issue #151 Buy this issue now Last year I visited Colonial Williamsburg’s The Cabinetmaker Shop for the first time in 25 years. It was a real treat for me. Woodworkers get...

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Arts & Mysteries: The Plane My Brother Is

How (and why) you should use the broad hatchet in the modern shop. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 40-42 From the November 2005 issue #151 Buy this issue now Estate inventories of cabinetmakers’ shops often include hatchets. Likewise, most of the admittedly few images of period shops depict hatchets prominently. It could well be that...

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Arts & Mysteries: The Secrets to Sawing Fast

The traditional hand saw (when wielded correctly) can size all your stock. Here’s a basic primer. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 42-45 From the October 2005 issue #150 Buy this issue now Hand saws were used to make some of the finest furniture ever built. They are very clearly capable of producing accurate cuts. Hand...

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Arts & Mysteries: Rumplestiltskin is My Name

Unlock the secrets of your hand planes by first learning their real names. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 82-85 From the August 2005 issue #149 Buy this issue now Ever-increasing numbers of woodworkers are using hand planes in their shops. Their demand for fine planes has given rise to boutique plane makers such as Clark...