Adam Cherubini

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Arts & Mysteries: Whetstone Sharpening

Part 1: No flat back. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-25 From the October 2011 issue #192 Buy this issue now I’ve tried most sharpening systems. I started with sandpaper and glass because it was cost-effective. It’s still tough to beat. You don’t have to worry about maintenance. If the paper rips or clogs, you throw it...

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Woodworking in America 2011: My Favorite Classes

I would be flat-out lying to you if I said we planned out Woodworking in America for you, our beloved readers. That’s crap. The truth is that we plan out Woodworking in America for us, the staff of the magazine. We sit around our conference table and wonder: Who would we like to meet?...

A Couple Interesting Threads on Drawers

There have been a couple interesting threads on the Society of American Period Furniture Makers (SAPFM) forum I’d like to make you aware of in case you missed them: On drawer construction: On drawer integration: I think construction details and their variation is particularly interesting. You can easily see how and why our woodworking...

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Arts & Mysteries: The Lost Arts & Mysteries

Revealing centuries-old secrets to working quickly and efficiently. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 32-36 From the December 2005 issue #152 Buy this issue now Arts & Mysteries is a phrase that oft appears in the contracts or indentures between master craftsmen and their apprentices. Exact usage varies, but the context is usually something like “…...

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The Anthony Hay Cabinet Shop

A look at Williamsburg’s period shop through the eyes of a passionate hand-tool woodworker. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 66-69 From the November 2005 issue #151 Buy this issue now Last year I visited Colonial Williamsburg’s The Cabinetmaker Shop for the first time in 25 years. It was a real treat for me. Woodworkers get...

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Arts & Mysteries: The Plane My Brother Is

How (and why) you should use the broad hatchet in the modern shop. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 40-42 From the November 2005 issue #151 Buy this issue now Estate inventories of cabinetmakers’ shops often include hatchets. Likewise, most of the admittedly few images of period shops depict hatchets prominently. It could well be that...

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Arts & Mysteries: The Secrets to Sawing Fast

The traditional hand saw (when wielded correctly) can size all your stock. Here’s a basic primer. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 42-45 From the October 2005 issue #150 Buy this issue now Hand saws were used to make some of the finest furniture ever built. They are very clearly capable of producing accurate cuts. Hand...

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Arts & Mysteries: Rumplestiltskin is My Name

Unlock the secrets of your hand planes by first learning their real names. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 82-85 From the August 2005 issue #149 Buy this issue now Ever-increasing numbers of woodworkers are using hand planes in their shops. Their demand for fine planes has given rise to boutique plane makers such as Clark...

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Arts & Mysteries: Advanced Chisel Techniques

When you know what you’re doing, chisels can be wonderfully helpful tools. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 82-86 From the June 2005 issue #148 Buy this issue now If all you want to do with your chisels is adjust machine-cut joints or slice glue drips, any technique or tool will work. This sort of work...