Adam Cherubini

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Arts & Mysteries: ‘Boarded’ Furniture

London’s clever carpenters found a way around the laws. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 22-24 From the February 2012 issue #195 Buy the issue now. “Boarded” is an archaic English term that was used to describe a form of woodwork characterized by the use of fasteners as the principle means of attachment. The iconic six-board chest is probably the...

Advice on Article Sought

I’m working on an article about making nailed (boarded) furniture. The new format at the magazine has restricted columns like mine to 2 pages and I’m having trouble getting the job done in 2. It could be that I’m naturally wordy. I’ve been teased for this in the past and I’m self conscious about...

Saving Woodworking, One Project at a Time

Thanks to Popular Woodworking Magazine, I was invited to panel discussion on saving woodworking at this years’ Woodworking In America  conference in Northern Ky. As I suspected, my perspective on this issue was a bit different from the others’ on the panel and I suspect from my friends in the room (it was held...

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There’s No Shame in Nails

Adam Cherubini, our Arts & Mysteries columnist and blogger, and a contributing editor to the magazine, generated quite a buzz at the Woodworking in America conference with his talk on nailed furniture. I’m sad to say that I wasn’t able to make Adam’s talk (maybe I was ranting about the nefarious Cult of the...

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What is an Oilstone?

The language surrounding so called oilstones is very misleading. First off, there’s no such thing as an “oilstone.” Long ago, these abrasive stones were simply called whetstones. “Whetting” was the period word for “sharpening” and it had nothing to do with applying liquid to a rock. Nor is oil required for their use. All...

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Arts & Mysteries: Whetstone Sharpening

Part 1: No flat back. By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-25 From the October 2011 issue #192 Buy this issue now I’ve tried most sharpening systems. I started with sandpaper and glass because it was cost-effective. It’s still tough to beat. You don’t have to worry about maintenance. If the paper rips or clogs, you throw it...

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Woodworking in America 2011: My Favorite Classes

I would be flat-out lying to you if I said we planned out Woodworking in America for you, our beloved readers. That’s crap. The truth is that we plan out Woodworking in America for us, the staff of the magazine. We sit around our conference table and wonder: Who would we like to meet?...