Article Index Peter Follansbee

Joint-Stool

Arts & Mysteries: Joyners vs. Carpenters, 1631

Period woodworking trades in London were strictly regulated. by Peter Follansbee pages 58-60 I’ve temporarily put down my 5⁄16″ joiner’s mortising chisel in favor of a 2″ chisel for chopping carpenter’s mortises. I’m timber framing a workshop, and while whomping away on 2″-wide mortises, I have time to think. My principal work has always...

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Arts & Mysteries: Give Me a Brake

Get some splitting leverage with this simple contraption. by Peter Follansbee pages 58-59 Reach for a froe, and you should immediately think, “Give me a brake.” The brake can be a constructed workholding device, or just a couple of logs. Its function is to trap your workpiece in such a way that you can...

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Arts & Mysteries: Furniture – It’s Meant to be Used

In some contemporary households, 17th-century style storage prevails. by Peter Follansbee pages 58-59 I once sold a chair to a woman who later told me how much she loved it. “I never let anyone sit in it!” she exclaimed, apparently to show me how special it was to her. I told her that was...

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Arts & Mysteries: A Disappearing Favorite

Will our grandchildren ever get to work with lightweight, versatile ash? by Peter Follansbee p. 50 My kids are often telling me that this or that toy is their favorite, but it seems that there are several that get this descriptor. Maybe they are rubbing off on me, but I find that I have...

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Arts & Mysteries: 21st-century Craft Education

Always remember where you (and your work) came from. by Peter Follansbee page 46 How we go about learning to build “period” furniture today is nothing like what the makers of our study pieces did. In the pre-Industrial era, apprenticeship was the principal method of learning any trade. In the English -speaking world, if...

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Arts & Mysteries: The Indispensable Mortise & Tenon

Drawbore it for a joint that will last centuries.  By Peter Follansbee pages 58-59 I once had a visitor to my shop remark that he’d like to see a book about all the types of joints that I use. I told him it’d be a pretty short book: One page for the rabbet joints I...

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Work Begun

Forget the stockpile of wood; what about the stock of partial projects? by Peter Follansbee page 58 When building furniture, some woodworkers keep a stockpile of lumber on hand and draw from their stacks as they begin a new project. Others buy enough lumber (with some extra) for each piece they are planning to...

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Arts & Mysteries: Simplicity Itself

Free up your hands with this useful Chinese wood carrier. by Peter Follansbee page 22 My wife, Maureen, came through the work area and asked, “What are you making?” When I told her, she said, “No, really, what are you making?” “A Chinese wood carrier. Really.” It’s for carrying any kind of wood, though;...

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Arts & Mysteries: Green Woodworking

While the term is easily understood, it’s not easily defined. by Peter Follansbee page 24 Back in the 1970s, there was an undercurrent in American woodworking that connected to an ancient past. After decades of home-workshop projects, many craftsmen were trying to understand some of the “old” ways of woodworking. One of these woodworkers...