Aged Cherry Finish

Aged Cherry Finish

Wipe on years of age
in a few easy steps.

By Tim Johnson

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If you want to make a woodworker gnash his teeth, ask him to make new
cherry look like cherry that has aged
naturally to a rich, brownish hue.

Why is this challenge so agonizing?
Because staining cherry, even with
stain that's the perfect color, doesn't do
the trick.

Here's why: Cherry’s surface is covered
with legions of tiny pores that are
almost impossible to see—until you
apply stain. Stain turns these pores
dark, so they stand out. Naturally aged
cherry doesn't show dark pores; so it's
impossible to create an authentic look
with stain alone.

Production shops solve the problem
by spraying on toned lacquer finishes;
old masters pad on shellac and handmixed
glaze. Here's a no-fuss method
that uses off-the-shelf products and
produces great results.

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Blend Color Mismatches

This story originally appeared in American Woodworker February/March 2009, issue #140.

February/March 2009, issue #140

Purchase this back issue.

Purchase the complete version of this woodworking technique story from AWBookstore.com.